Machine Felting.

 

I’m no expert but I have made a few things using the hand felting technique but had never given machine felting much thought. That was until I was visiting one of my favourite wool shops¬†Karelia House¬†near Aberfeldy. There I fell in love with a felted bag I just had to make. It was made using Colinette Hullabaloo 100% wool. Choosing 2 colours for the stripes was easy- nice bright and contrasting; pink and turquoise.

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Having bought my wool I was entitled to a free pattern for the bag so I was all set to get knitting. It was an easy knit and I was soon finished with that part of the process.

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Next a bit of stitching up. The pattern suggested mattress stitch. I wasn’t sure what that was so a visit to YouTube soon enlightened me. Mattress stitch certainly made the seams nice and snug and I’ll be using it again for suitable projects in the future.

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And now for the scary/exciting bit- the machine wash! Tossing my nurtured project into the washing machine and leaving it to the mercy of the 40 degree C wash cycle I went off to work on another project. When the machine wash finished I was right there, holding my breath to see the results……..and I wasn’t disappointed.

Once dry I had fun adding a fun way to fasten my bag using pom poms and a wooden embellishment bought at Hobbycraft.

Here is how it looks.image

Our local Flower Show was yesterday so I bravely entered it in the felted design class.image

What a lovely surprise awaited me after the judges had finished!

Knitted Jumper.

August was Archaeology month for me. I spent most of it digging- but that’s not what I wanted to share today!

However, it was at one of the digs that I met a Finnish student. One day she appeared wearing this stunning jumper.

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When I asked her about it she told me someone had knitted it for her mother a long time ago. I’m assuming it’s an Icelandic Lopi style pattern. Lovely to see it is still being loved by the next generation.

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I love the way the knitter has also added the colours used for the yoke as dots throughout the rest of the jumper. I have no idea if this was part of the pattern being followed or a creative innovation of their own. I remember these Icelandic jumpers being very popular in the 70’s and a few of my friends knitted them but never in such a colourful, individual way!